Multiple FabricTransportServiceRemotingListeners

There are many reasons why you would want to have multiple Service Fabric remoting listeners. I wanted to have my primary services within the replica partitions doing all the work and writing its state. The state would then be replicated to the secondary services and I would then read the state from the secondaries. This would allow higher read though-put. The second reason was code separation, as I didn't want my StatefulService to become a massive facade that would just forward requests on to other classes to handle. Instead, I wanted to tell service fabric XyzService to handle these requests from the listener but have them hosted under the same Service Fabric service and then share the state for that service.

So, say we have a stateful service called MyStatefulService that implements the contracts of IQueryNames and IAppendName which we will be exposing over service remoting listeners, our class would look something like the following:

public sealed class MyStatefulService : StatefulService, IQueryNames, IAddName
{
    public MyStatefulService(StatefulServiceContext serviceContext, IReliableStateManagerReplica reliableStateManagerReplica)
        : base(serviceContext, reliableStateManagerReplica) { }

    public Task<string[]> GetNames()
    {
        //...
    }

    public Task AddName(string name)
    {
        //...
    }

    protected override IEnumerable<ServiceReplicaListener> CreateServiceReplicaListeners()
    {
        return new[]
        {
            new ServiceReplicaListener(this.CreateServiceRemotingListener)
        };
    }
}

Our service would override the CreateServiceReplicaListeners method and return one service remoting listener, which is created using the extension method of CreateServiceRemotingListener. So let's look at moving our 2 bits of functionality GetNames and AddNames in to their own classes.

Single responsibility

To keep this simple we will just create a class called QueryNamesHandler and AddNameHandler.

public class QueryNamesHandler : IQueryNames
{
    public Task<string[]> GetNames()
    {
        //...
    }
}

public class AddNameHandler : IAddName
{
    public Task AddName(string name)
    {
        //...
    }
}

Wiring up the listeners

We will then need to modify the overridden method CreateServiceInstanceListeners to explicitly create two FabricTransportServiceRemotingListener and pass in an instance of each of our handlers. When we use 2 or more listeners we will have to explicitly name each one. Service Fabric uses these names to keep track of the listeners so they need to be unique.

protected override IEnumerable<ServiceInstanceListener> CreateServiceInstanceListeners()
{
    return new []
    {
        new ServiceInstanceListener(context =>
            new FabricTransportServiceRemotingListener(context, new QueryNamesHandler()),
                "QueryNamesHandlerListener"),
        new ServiceInstanceListener(context =>
            new FabricTransportServiceRemotingListener(context, new AddNameHandler()),
                "AddNameHandlerListener")
    };
}

The above needs to be modified a bit more so we can run 2 listeners. The above code works smoothly with some listeners but the FabricTransportServiceRemotingListener will not share the same Endpoint configuration with another listener, even if we are not declaring any special configuration. Due to this fact, we will need to pass in a FabricTransportListenerSettings to the listener to change the EndpointResourceName. For this example we will use the names of QueryNamesHandlerEndpoint and AddNameHandlerEndpoint

protected override IEnumerable<ServiceInstanceListener> CreateServiceInstanceListeners()
{
    return new []
    {
        new ServiceInstanceListener(context => new FabricTransportServiceRemotingListener(context, new QueryNamesHandler(),
            new FabricTransportListenerSettings()
            {
                EndpointResourceName = "QueryNamesHandlerEndpoint"
            }), "QueryNamesHandlerListener"),
        new ServiceInstanceListener(
            context => new FabricTransportServiceRemotingListener(context, new AddNameHandler(),
                new FabricTransportListenerSettings()
                {
                    EndpointResourceName = "AddNameHandlerEndpoint"
                }), "AddNameHandlerListener")
    };
}

Now we have changed the endpoint name we will have to change the ServiceManifest.xml to reflect these changes.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<ServiceManifest Name="MyStatelessServicePkg"
                 Version="1.0.0"
                 xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/2011/01/fabric"
                 xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
                 xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
  <ServiceTypes> <!-- ... --> </ServiceTypes>
  <CodePackage Name="Code" Version="1.0.0"> <!-- ... --> </CodePackage>
  <ConfigPackage Name="Config" Version="1.0.0" />

  <Resources>
    <Endpoints>
      <!-- These are required even if we're not specifying any overrides -->
      <Endpoint Name="AdderServiceEndpoint" />
      <Endpoint Name="MultiplierServiceEndpoint" />
    </Endpoints>
  </Resources>
</ServiceManifest>

Consuming

Consuming the endpoints is a little different compared to normal. We can still use the ServiceProxy but we will need to specify the listenerName when creating the proxy. Below is a simple example of how to consume our services.

var adder = ServiceProxy.Create<IAdder>(new Uri("fabric:/MultipleListeners/MyStatelessService"), new PartitionKey(0), listenerName: "AdderListener");
var result = await adder.Add(a, b).ConfigureAwait(false);

This now should give you a basic understanding of how we can use multiple service fabric listeners within one service.


Kevin Smith

Developer, technology enthusiast and @dotnetsheff organiser.